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New Kingdom (Egypt, 1550 BC - 1070 BC)

New Kingdom (Egypt, 1550 BC - 1070 BC)

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  • KEY TOPICS KEY TOPICS A sundial dating to the 13th century B.C. and considered one of the oldest Egyptian sundials, was discovered in Egypt's Valley of the Kings, the burial place of rulers from Egypt's New Kingdom period (around 1550 B.C. to 1070 B.C.).(More...)
  • An egyptian alabaster jug - new kingdom, dynast y XVIII - XX, 1550 / 1070 B. (More...)

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  • The victory of Ahmose over the Hyksos ushered in the New Kingdom period of Egypt (1550 BC-1070 B.C.E.)(More...)



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KEY TOPICS KEY TOPICS A sundial dating to the 13th century B.C. and considered one of the oldest Egyptian sundials, was discovered in Egypt's Valley of the Kings, the burial place of rulers from Egypt's New Kingdom period (around 1550 B.C. to 1070 B.C.). [1] The Valley of the Kings was where Egyptian royalty was buried during the time of the New Kingdom in the years 1550 to 1070 BC. The deposits were found in the western valley, sometimes called the Valley of the Monkeys. [1] A beautiful, large ancient Egyptian alabaster vase, dating to the New Kingdom, circa 1550-1070 BC. The Valley of the Kings was where Egyptian royalty was buried during the time of the New Kingdom in the years 1550 to 1070 BC. The deposits were found in the western valley, sometimes called the Valley of the Monkeys. [1]

Egyptian art spans over 4000 years and includes the Old Kingdom 3200 - 2185 BC, Middle Kingdom 2040 - 1650 BC, New Kingdom 1550 - 1070 BC. This Ancient Egyptian New Kingdom Heart Amulet, 1550 BC is no longer available. [1]

In the New Kingdom of Egypt, between 1550 BC and 1070 BC, the mystique of creating these massive monuments for tombs had passed, the empire fluxing in the power of the pharaoh and the place held above the people. [1] KEY TOPICS KEY TOPICS KEY TOPICS Mut was an Egyptian mother goddess who came to prominence during the New Kingdom (c. 1550 - c. 1070 BC) as a result of her relationship with the god Amun. [1] Egyptian art spans over 4000 years and includes the Old Kingdom 3200 - 2185 BC, Middle Kingdom 2040 - 1650 BC, New Kingdom 1550 - 1070 BC. Presentation on theme: "Timeline of Ancient Egypt 1532 - 1070 B. C. The New Kingdom Armies conquered nearby lands, and Egypt’s power grew. [1]

An egyptian alabaster jug - new kingdom, dynast y XVIII - XX, 1550 / 1070 B. In the 4th century BC, Egypt became a Hellenistic kingdom under the Ptolemaic dynasty (305-30 BC), which assumed the pharaonic role, maintaining the traditional religion and building or rebuilding many temples, the kingdom's Greek ruling class identified the Egyptian deities with their own. [1] New Kingdom c. 1550 c. 1100 B.C. or c.1520 c. 1075 B.C. or c. 1570 c. 1070 B.C. or c. 1552 c. 1069 B.C. AN EGYPTIAN GLASS TAWERET AMULET NEW KINGDOM, DYNASTY XVIII, CIRCA 1353-1336 B.C. Representing the hippopotamus goddess standing, in white and green glass, with suspension loop 1 3/8 in. (3.4 cm.) [1] New Kingdom c. 1550 c. 1100 B.C. or c.1520 c. 1075 B.C. or c. 1570 c. 1070 B.C. or c. 1552 c. 1069 B.C. AN EGYPTIAN ALABASTER SPOON NEW KINGDOM, MID-18TH-19TH DYNASTY, CIRCA 1390-1069 B.C. Of lotus-bud shape with gently curving sides, a vestigial handle emerging from the lower edge 5 ¾ in. (14.6 cm.) [1] New Kingdom c. 1550 c. 1100 B.C. or c.1520 c. 1075 B.C. or c. 1570 c. 1070 B.C. or c. 1552 c. 1069 B.C. Egyptian, New Kingdom, ca. 1550 B.C.-1070 B.C. by TheNewHobbyist, published Apr 18, 2013 Egyptian, New Kingdom, ca. 1550 B.C.-1070 B.C. by TheNewHobbyist is licensed under the Creative Commons - Public Domain Dedication license. [1] Egyptian, New Kingdom, ca. 1550 B.C.-1070 B.C." was caught using 123D Get at The Field Museum, Chicago IL USA. Presentation on theme: "Timeline of Ancient Egypt 1532 - 1070 B. C. The New Kingdom Armies conquered nearby lands, and Egypt’s power grew. [1]

Dating to the 19th dynasty, or the 13th century B.C., the sundial was found on the floor of a workman's hut, in the Valley of the Kings, the burial place of rulers from Egypt's New Kingdom period (around 1550 B.C. to 1070 B.C.). [1]

The New Kingdom lasted between 1550 BC and 1070 BC. Mark Millmore discusses the dynasties of the New Kingdom. [1] Once more, it was the Theban elite that rallied the Egyptians, driving out the Hyksos and re-establishing unity with the eighteenth dynasty around 1550 BC. The New Kingdom thus created would prove to be the zenith of the ancient Egyptian civilisation. [1] The anthropoid (human-shaped) coffin of Amenemipet is typical of Egyptian coffins of the period immediately after the New Kingdom (that is, after about 1070 BC). [1] The origins of the kingdom lie in the centuries following the withdrawal of the Egyptian imperial administration around 1070 BC. The rulers were of Kushite ancestry but had adopted many of the trappings of Egyptian culture, including pharaonic titles and regalia, and a devotion to the Egyptian deity, Amun. [1]

The New Kingdom was established and lasted approximately from 1550 B.C. to 1070 B.C. This reunification launched the Egyptians along a new militaristic path. [1] A ferocious Egyptian family from Luxor waged a brilliant and fierce set of wars with the Hyksos kings and finally drove them out of Egypt by 1550 B.C. Ahmose I, the great general who did this, then founded a new dynasty, the Eighteenth, which ushered in the era of the New Kingdom. [1] New Kingdom: term to describe the period in Egypt from 1550 B.C. -1070 B.C. Egyptian, New Kingdom, ca. 1550 B.C.-1070 B.C. by TheNewHobbyist Egyptian, New Kingdom, ca. 1550 B.C.-1070 B.C. by TheNewHobbyist is licensed under the Creative Commons - Public Domain Dedication license. [1] Egyptian, New Kingdom, ca. 1550 B.C.-1070 B.C." was captured using 123D Catch at The Field Museum, Chicago IL USA. The New Kingdom of Egypt, also referred to as the Egyptian Empire, is the period in ancient Egyptian history between the 16th century BC and the 11th century BC, covering the Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Dynasties of Egypt. [1]

"Nestled in the cliffs on the west bank of the Nile at Luxor, the isolated Valley of the Kings is home to the tombs of the great pharaohs of the New Kingdom (1550 - 1070 BC). [1] New Kingdom c. 1550 c. 1100 B.C. or c.1520 c. 1075 B.C. or c. 1570 c. 1070 B.C. or c. 1552 c. 1069 B.C. #AE2648: $250 SOLD New Kingdom, 1570 - 1070 BC. Nice steatite scarab. [1] This arrangement is often depicted on coffins of the New Kingdom (circa 1550 - 1070 BC) and early first millennium BC. Bakenmut's crossed hands hold the djed pillar and tit amulet. [1]

Old Kingdom: 2600 B.C. to 2200 B.C. Middle Kingdom: 2055 B.C. to 1650 B.C. New Kingdom: 1550 B.C. to 1070 B.C. In the 22nd century BC, the Old Kingdom collapsed into the disorder of the First Intermediate Period, with important consequences for Egyptian religion. [1] An Egyptian long necked vessel, found at Abydos and dates from the New Kingdom period, ca. 1570 1070 BCE. Askut in Nubia investigates the economic and political factors contributing to a change in Egyptian imperial policy from a system of equilibrium stressing separation during the Middle Kingdom (c. 1900-1650 BC), to a new policy of acculturation in the New Kingdom (1550-1070 BC). [1]

Egyptian, New Kingdom, ca. 1550 B.C.-1070 B.C." was captured using 123D Catch at The Field Museum, Chicago IL USA. AN EGYPTIAN ALABASTER SPOON NEW KINGDOM, MID-18TH-19TH DYNASTY, CIRCA 1390-1069 B.C. Of lotus-bud shape with gently curving sides, a vestigial handle emerging from the lower edge 5 ¾ in. (14.6 cm.) [1] Egyptian, New Kingdom, ca. 1550 B.C.-1070 B.C." was captured using 123D Catch at The Field Museum, Chicago IL USA. AN EGYPTIAN GLASS TAWERET AMULET NEW KINGDOM, DYNASTY XVIII, CIRCA 1353-1336 B.C. Representing the hippopotamus goddess standing, in white and green glass, with suspension loop 1 3/8 in. (3.4 cm.) [1] Egyptian, New Kingdom, ca. 1550 B.C.-1070 B.C. by TheNewHobbyist, published Apr 18, 2013 Egyptian, New Kingdom, ca. 1550 B.C.-1070 B.C. by TheNewHobbyist is licensed under the Creative Commons - Public Domain Dedication license. [1]

These textwere discovered duringarcheological excavations of Deir el-Medina, a village occupied during ancient Egypt's New Kingdom period, which spanned between 1550 and1070 B.C. The villagewas the home to the highly skilled craftsmen charged with creating rock-cut tombs for royalty in the Valley of the Kings. [1] Egyptian, New Kingdom, ca. 1550 B.C.-1070 B.C." was captured using 123D Catch at The Field Museum, Chicago IL USA. Egypt's administrative capital was located in this general area from the beginning of the Early Dynastic period until the late New Kingdom, and remained important throughout Egyptian history. [1] Egyptian, New Kingdom, ca. 1550 B.C.-1070 B.C." was captured using 123D Catch at The Field Museum, Chicago IL USA. In 20 years he led at least 17 different military campaigns, subduing kingdoms from Libya to Syria into Egyptian subjects and extending Egypt's control in the south from the area around Buhen down to Kurgus. [1]

Egyptian, New Kingdom, ca. 1550 B.C.-1070 B.C." was captured using 123D Catch at The Field Museum, Chicago IL USA. Egyptian Duck Amulet, New Kingdom, ca. 1550-1070 BC. An amethyst amulet of a duck, looking back and resting head on wings. [1] A beautiful, large ancient Egyptian alabaster vase, dating to the New Kingdom, circa 1550-1070 BC. Egyptian, New Kingdom, ca. 1550 B.C.-1070 B.C. by TheNewHobbyist, published Apr 18, 2013 Egyptian, New Kingdom, ca. 1550 B.C.-1070 B.C. by TheNewHobbyist is licensed under the Creative Commons - Public Domain Dedication license. [1]

However native Egyptians continued to rule southern Egypt and in 1550 BC they drove out the Hyksos and reunited Egypt. [2] New evidence from Askut shows how the Egyptian colonial communities were not abandoned but instead survived the conquest of the former colony by the king of Kush (c. 1650 BC), staying on after the Egyptian re-conquest in 1550 BC to form an ideal conduit for implementing the new policy of cultural assimilation. [1]

The Hyksos ruled northern Egypt from the capital city of Avaris until around 1550 BC. Interesting Facts About the Middle Kingdom of Egypt The pharaohs of the Middle Kingdom often appointed their sons as coregents, which was kind of like a vice-pharaoh. [1] In 1070 BC the New Kingdom and 20th Dynasty ended with the death of Ramesses XI. Circa 945 BC, Sheshonq I, leader of the Libu (aka Meshwesh), invaded Egypt and usurped the throne. [1] Third Intermediate Period - The Third Intermediate Period of Ancient Egypt began with the death of Pharaoh Ramesses XI in 1070 BC, ending the New Kingdom, and was eventually followed by the Late Period. [1]

The Valley of the Kings (actually two distinct valleys) was used to bury royalty during much of the New Kingdom era, from about 1550 to 1070 B.C. Rulers were interred in elaborate underground structures, with chambers and passages decorated with paintings and filled with everything a pharaoh could desire in this world or the next. [1] They were Dynasty 18 through Dynasty 20, which together comprise the New Kingdom and stretch from 1550 to 1070 B.C. (Dynasty dates remain under debate; these come from the Atlas of Ancient Egypt by John Baines and Jaromir Mí¡lek.) [1] Statue head of a woman New Kingdom ca. 1550 B.C. - 1070 B.C. Field museum, Chicago. [1] The New Kingdom lasted from about 1550 B.C. to 1070 B.C. and it included the 18th, 19th and 20th dynasties. [1] The challenges he faced before he died in 1156 B.C., including threats from abroad and treachery at home, continued to plague the New Kingdom until it collapsed around 1070 B.C. A beautiful, large ancient Egyptian alabaster vase, dating to the New Kingdom, circa 1550-1070 BC. A beautiful, large ancient Egyptian alabaster vase, dating to the New Kingdom, circa 1550-1070 BC. A large and impressive vase, with a ribbed circular base, short body, bulging sligh. [1] Egyptian, New Kingdom, ca. 1550 B.C.-1070 B.C." was captured using 123D Catch at The Field Museum, Chicago IL USA. A beautiful, large ancient Egyptian alabaster vase, dating to the New Kingdom, circa 1550-1070 BC. A large and impressive vase, with a ribbed circular base, short body, bulging sligh. [1] The Twenty-fourth Dynasty was a short-lived rival dynasty located in the western Delta (Sais, known as Zau to the Egyptians), with only two Pharaohs ruling from 732 to 720 BC. Their reunification of Lower Egypt, Upper Egypt, and Kish created the largest Egyptian empire since the New Kingdom. [1] Tutankhamun : An Egyptian pharaoh of the 18th dynasty (ruled c. 1332 BC-1323 BC in the conventional chronology), during the period of Egyptian history known as the New Kingdom. [1] Portrait of Egyptian Pharaoh Akhenaten, Neues Museum. (Reign: ca. 1351/3-1334/6 BC), New Kingdom Period, Dynasty 18, ca. 1340 BC. Quartzite head of a statue of one of the six daughters of Pharaoh Akhenaten and Queen Nefertiti from about 1345 BC, 18th Dynasty, New Kingdom of Ancient Egypt, on display in the Staatliches Museum Agyptischer Kunst (State Museum of Egyptian Art) in Munich, Bavaria, Germany. [1] The Twentieth Dynasty of Egypt (notated Dynasty XX, alternatively 20th Dynasty or Dynasty 20 ) is classified as the third and last dynasty of the Ancient Egyptian New Kingdom period, lasting from 1189 BC to 1077 BC. The 19th and 20th Dynasties furthermore together constitute an era known as the Ramesside period. [1]

Scholars often refer to dynasties 18-20 as encompassing the "New Kingdom," a period that lasted ca. 1550-1070 B.C. This time period takes place after the Hyksos had been driven out of Egypt by a series of Egyptian rulers and the country was reunited. [1]

The city, known as Waset to ancient Egyptians and as Luxor today, was the capital of Egypt during parts of the Middle Kingdom (2040 to 1750 B.C.) and the New Kingdom (circa 1550 to 1070 B.C.). [1]

The Thirteenth Dynasty is notable for the accession of the first formally recognised Semitic-speaking king, the Fifteenth Dynasty dates approximately from 1650 to 1550 BC. Known rulers of the Fifteenth Dynasty are as follows, Salitis Sakir-Har Khyan Apophis, 1550-1540 BC The Fifteenth Dynasty of Egypt was the first Hyksos dynasty, ruled from Avaris, without control of the entire land. [1] It is the tomb of Amenemhat, a prominent goldsmith from the 18 th Dynasty, New Kingdom period (1550 BC to 1292 BC). [1] During the New Kingdom (1550 BC- 1077 BC) Pharaohs were buried in the Valley of the Kings and few pyramids were built. [1]

These Kingdoms are separated by Intermediate Periods characterised by political instability with the glory of Ancient Egypt falling into decline around 1070 BC when Egypt effectively split back into two states. [1] Orange County CA. #AE2660: $375 New Kingdom, 1570 - 1070 BC. Steatite scarab. [1] The legs are well cut. 20 mm. #091060: $275 New Kingdom, 1570 - 1070 BC. Steatite scarab. [1] #AE2648: $250 SOLD New Kingdom, 1570 - 1070 BC. Nice steatite scarab. [1]

It lasted from 1550 to 1070 BC. During this era Egypt was rich and powerful once again. [1] This is where some 40 to 120 workers and their families lived between 1550 and 1070 BC. These were the workers who built and decorated the royal tombs in the Valley of the Kings, where the legendary King Tutankhamen is buried, along with other pharoahs and elites. [1]

Their power grew as rapidly as their numbers until the power of the Egyptian Pharaoh fell into oblivion and Egypt entered another period of disorder called The Second Intermediate Period, which lasted from 1640 to 1550 B.C. During this period, Egypt was ruled by foreign kings for almost 100 years. [1] The Twenty-fourth Dynasty was a short-lived rival dynasty located in the western Delta (Sais, known as Zau to the Egyptians), with only two Pharaohs ruling from 732 to 720 BC. This resulted in a peak in Egypt's power and wealth during the reign of Amenhotep III. During the reign of Thutmose III (c. 1479-1425 BC), Pharaoh, originally referring to the king's palace, became a form of address for the person who was king. [1] MET EGYPTIAN AMULET NECKLACE, NEW KINGDOM, DYNASTY 18, REIGN OF AMENHOTEP III C. 1390-1353 BC Found in Amenhotep III’s ancient palace complex at Malkata in Thebes during the excavations of 1910-11. [1] Superb Egyptian Serpentine Bust of a Nile God, New Kingdom, Mid XVIIIth Dynasty, Ca. 1450 BC. Beautiful facial features with outlined eyes and striated wig. [1] Deserving special mention are Samuel’s ( 1994, 1999, 2000 ) investigations of desiccated Egyptian bread from tombs in the New Kingdom (ca. 1550–1070  bc ) which resulted in significant insights into ancient bread and beer making. [1] Then Continue your day Tour to Deir el Medina, known as The Valley of the worker, Deir el-Medina is an ancient Egyptian village which was home to the artisans who worked on the tombs in the Valley of the Kings during the 18th to 20th dynasties of the New Kingdom period (ca. 1550-1080 BC) The paintings appear so fresh. [1] The mummy of Ramses II, around 1303 BC Chr - June 27, 1213 BC, was the third ancient Egyptian king, Pharaoh, from the 19th Dynasty of the New Kingdom. [1]

Circa 1800 BC, Hyksos forces first appeared in Egypt and eventually conquered the Lower Kingdom during Egypt's 13th Dynasty. [1] These events are listed on the Biblical Timeline under "Intermediate Kingdoms" from 2004 BC to 1529 BC. This period lasted from 1550-1070 BC. During this period Egypt became an empire when Thutmose III conquered Palestine, Syria, and Nubia this empire lasted to Amenhoptep VI who ended Egypt's worship of many gods in favour of one god Aton. [1]

Tanutamun's line continued at Napata, and up the Nile at Meroë, for many centuries, in fact a thousand years, not only ruling as good Egyptian kings, always calling themselves "King of Upper and Lower Egypt," but actually building pyramids, as at right, for their burial, turning Egypt's one black dynasty into a separate historic black African kingdom, whose rulers were often Queens as well as Kings. [1] Egyptian Old Kingdom, Dynasty 4, reign of Khufu or later 2551-2465 B.C. Egyptian Middle Kingdom, late Dynasty 11 or early Dynasty 2040-1783 B.C. The first pharaoh of the Old Kingdom was Djoser, who ruled Egypt from 2630-2611 B.C. He was responsible for the construction of one of the very first pyramids ever built by the ancient Egyptians. [1] The New Kingdom of Egypt, also referred to as the Egyptian Empire, is the period in ancient Egyptian history between the 16th century BC and the 11th century BC, covering the 18th, 19th, and 20th Dynasties of Egypt. [3] A striking ancient Egyptian wooden shabti dating to the New Kingdom, Ramesside Period, 20th Dynasty, circa 1187-1064 BC. The figure is depicted mummiform, with long slender body, tri. [1] An ancient Egyptian funerary text, based on the Papyrus of Ani, a papyrus manuscript with cursive hieroglyphs and color illustrations created c. 1250 BC, in the 19th dynasty of the New Kingdom of ancient Egypt. [1] Egyptian Tan Steatite Scarab for Thutmose III, New Kingdom, Ca. 18th to 20th Dyn, Ca. 1401-1080 BC. Naturalistic beetle top; base inscribed in hieroglyphics with a cartouche of the Pharaoh Thutmose III and other symbols. [1] Egyptian Steatite Carved Scarab, New Kingdom, Ca. 1500 BC. Gray stone carved; naturalistic top with good head; Base inscribed with couchant lion (sphinx) with human head. [1] Egyptian Alabaster Footed Bowl, New Kingdom, Ca. 1500 BC. Globular vase on raised circular disc foot. [1]

Egypt -- History -- New Kingdom, ca. 1550-ca. 1070 B.C. -- Sources. [1] Old Kingdom: 2600 B.C. to 2200 B.C. Middle Kingdom: 2055 B.C. to 1650 B.C. New Kingdom: 1550 B.C. to 1070 B.C. Ah yes. [1] Predynastic Period c. 3500 c. 3100 B.C. or c. 3100 c. 2950 B.C. or c. 3100 B.C. or c. 4500 c. 3150 B.C. Third Intermediate Period c. 1100 c. 728 B.C. or c.1075 c. 715 B.C. or c. 1070 c. 747 B.C. or c. 1069 c. 702 B.C. The Old Kingdom lasted from 2686 B.C. to 2181 B.C. It included the 3rd through the 6th dynasty. [1] Timeline of Ancient Egypt 1532 - 1070 B. C. The New Kingdom Armies conquered nearby lands, and Egypt’s power grew. [1] The nearly 500-year period of the ancient Egyptian empire otherwise known as the New Kingdom (ca. 1550-1070 BC) produced a number of fascinating individuals at the highest echelons of power, whose names and works have survived to modern times, and, in many cases, their actual physical bodies, as well. [1] After another decline, Egyptian power came back in a major way during the New Kingdom, dating from roughly 1550-1070 BC. The New Kingdom saw a great expansion of power and wealth, and pharaohs channeled this prosperity into major building projects. [1]

AN EGYPTIAN ALABASTER SPOON NEW KINGDOM, MID-18TH-19TH DYNASTY, CIRCA 1390-1069 B.C. Of lotus-bud shape with gently curving sides, a vestigial handle emerging from the lower edge 5 ¾ in. (14.6 cm.) [1] AN EGYPTIAN GLASS TAWERET AMULET NEW KINGDOM, DYNASTY XVIII, CIRCA 1353-1336 B.C. Representing the hippopotamus goddess standing, in white and green glass, with suspension loop 1 3/8 in. (3.4 cm.) [1]

It's assumed it was colonized during the time of Ramesses III, who was the 2nd Pharaoh of the 20th dynasty (1186 - 1155 BC), but you're right in that the earliest material evidence of Egyptian presence at Siwa appears to be a necropolis of the 26th dynasty (according to Egypt's tourist websites ). [1] Egypt's New Kingdom ( 1539--1070 BC), especially the 18th Dynasty ( 1504--1450 BC), sa w some of Egypt's most famous Pharaohs. [1] Historians place the rise of the first major period of Ancient Egypt's history, known as the Old Kingdom, at around 2686 BC and say that it lasted until 2134 BC. It was during this period that the first pyramid was built by Djoser and Cheops built the Great Pyramid which is the only remaining seven wonders of the ancient world. [1] Ancient Egypt's history is then divided into three stable Kingdoms the Old Kingdom (2686-2181 BC) when the Pyramids were built, the Middle Kingdom (2055-1650 BC) which saw an explosion in art and literature, and the New Kingdom (1550-1069 BC) when many great temples were built. [1]

The first period of Egyptian history, which ended in 2181 BC is called the Old Kingdom. [1] "The First Intermediate Period, often described as a "dark period" in ancient Egyptian history, spanned approximately one hundred and twenty-five years, from c. 2181-2055 BC, after the end of the Old Kingdom. [1] Sneferu's Bent Pyramid in Dahshur The Bent Pyramid is an ancient Egyptian pyramid located at the royal necropolis of Dahshur, approximately 40 kilometres south of Cairo, built under the Old Kingdom Pharaoh Sneferu (c. 2600 BC). [1] Four Ancient Egyptian faience rosettes, dating to the New Kingdom, Reign of Ramesses, 1550-1295 BC. These remarkable inlays are often called rosettes, though they probably depict dai. [1] Deir el-Medina was home to a community of workers and artisans in charge of digging and decorating the tombs of Pharaohs in the ancient Egyptian New Kingdom period (16th century BC-11th century BC). [1]

Eventually rulers from Thebes reunified the Egyptian nation in the Middle Kingdom (c. 2055-1650 BC). [1] Askut in Nubia investigates the economic and political factors contributing to a change in Egyptian imperial policy from a system of equilibrium stressing separation during the Middle Kingdom (c. 1900-1650 BC), to a new policy of acculturation in the New Kingdom (1550-1070 BC). [1] Egyptian Middle Kingdom Turquoise & Black Glazed Composition Amulet of a Cat, Ca. 2000 BC. Modeled seated upright and decorated in turquoise and with black spots; a suspension loop on the back, 2in. (5cm.), + custom mount. [1] Egyptian Painted Wood Sarcophagus Panel, Middle Kingdom, Ca. 2040-1786 BC. A long section of a wood sarcophagus containing two lines of hieroglyphic inscription painted in black on an ochre background. [1] Egyptian Dark Stone Carved Concubine, Middle Kingdom, Ca. 2133 to 1797 BC. A figure of a naked female, her hands held to her sides, wearing a Hathor wig with four loose locks at the back. 3¾in. (9.5cm.) high + custom mount. [1] From the Middle Kingdom (2040-1640 BC) onward, Osiris was one of the most important Egyptian gods. [1] The Middle Kingdom was the next era of Egyptian growth, lasting from roughly 2000-1700 BC. There were cultural changes, including a new capital city and shifts in the importance of certain deities. [1] It lasted from 1975 BC to 1640 BC. The Middle Kingdom was the second peak period of the Ancient Egyptian civilization (the other two being the Old Kingdom and the New Kingdom). [1]

Nondescript chambers built into the valley's dusty hills hold royal remains, buried between 1550 and 1070 BC. The crypts were designed to deter robbers, and for the most part, they worked--which makes it difficult for today’s archaeologists to find them and identify their inhabitants. [1]

Karnak would remain a modest precinct up until the New Kingdom, a time period that ran from roughly 1550 to 1070 B.C., when work accelerated with many of the greatest buildings being constructed. [1] Secreted in the cliffs of a Y-shaped ravine, the Valley of the Queens houses some 90 known tombs of queens, princes, and other notables from the New Kingdom (1550 to 1070). [1] An example on display at the British Museum that dates from the New Kingdom, between 1550 and 1070 B.C., shows a long wooden handle with two wooden blades at the bottom, tipped with bronze to help turn the soil. [1] During the New Kingdom (1550 - 1070 B.C.), the priesthood became a distinct class. [1]

King Ahmose I inaugurated the triumphant New Kingdom around 1550 B.C. when he drove the Hyksos out and pursued them into Palestine, capturing their fortress at Sharuhen. [1] The ancient cultures of Egypt, Greece, and Rome combined spread across several millennia, from the rise of Egypt's Old Kingdom in the 27th century B.C. to the fall of the Roman Empire in the 4th century A.D. Over these expansive eras, artists and artisans from all three cultures shared in a rich visual artistic tradition, conjuring painted and sculptural forms that oscillated between realistic and abstract figural forms. [1] The Old Kingdom started circa 2700 BC during Egypt's 3rd dynasty. [1]

In 20 years he led at least 17 different military campaigns, subduing kingdoms from Libya to Syria into Egyptian subjects and extending Egypt's control in the south from the area around Buhen down to Kurgus. [1] A beautiful, large ancient Egyptian alabaster vase, dating to the New Kingdom, circa 1550-1070 BC. A large and impressive vase, with a ribbed circular base, short body, bulging slightly at the shoulders and a tall fat neck with rounded rim. [1] An ancient Egyptian limestone relief, dating to the New Kingdom, 1550-1070 BC. [1] A beautiful, large ancient Egyptian alabaster vase, dating to the New Kingdom, circa 1550-1070 BC. During the late Old Kingdom (2686-2181 BC) and the First Intermediate Period (c. 2181-2055 BC), the Egyptians gradually came to believe that possession of a ba and the possibility of a paradisiacal afterlife extended to everyone. [1]

Second Intermediate Period c. 1650 c. 1550 B.C. or c. 1640 c. 1520 B.C. or c. 1782 c. 1570 B.C. or c. 1674 c. 1553 B.C. This tradition started with the Egyptian priest Manetho, who lived during the third century B.C. His accounts of ancient Egyptian history were preserved by ancient Greek writers and, until the deciphering of hieroglyphic writing in the 19 th century, were one of the few historical accounts that scholars could read. [1] Is the period in ancient Egyptian history between the 16th century BC and the 11th century BC, they follow the second intermediate period and was succeeded by the third intermediate period and it was Egypt's most prosperous time. [1]

The Third Intermediate Period lasted between 1070 BC and 712 BC. Digital Egypt has an excellent overview of this period. [1] Circa 1550 BC, Ahmose I succeeded in driving out the Hyksos. [1] It came into use before circa 1550 BC and remained in widespread use for more than a millennium and a half. [1]

This time period lasted from 1550 B.C. to 1070 B.C. The pharaohs of this time period had began conquering lands in Asia and other parts of Africa. [4]


An egyptian alabaster jug - new kingdom, dynast y XVIII - XX, 1550 / 1070 B. [5] A beautiful, large ancient Egyptian alabaster vase, dating to the New Kingdom, circa 1550-1070 BC. [6]

Ah yes. It's assumed it was colonized during the time of Ramesses III, who was the 2nd Pharaoh of the 20th dynasty (1186 - 1155 BC), but you're right in that the earliest material evidence of Egyptian presence at Siwa appears to be a necropolis of the 26th dynasty (according to Egypt's tourist websites ). [7] The first pharaoh of the Old Kingdom was Djoser, who ruled Egypt from 2630-2611 B.C. He was responsible for the construction of one of the very first pyramids ever built by the ancient Egyptians. [8]

POSSIBLY USEFUL
The victory of Ahmose over the Hyksos ushered in the New Kingdom period of Egypt (1550 BC-1070 B.C.E.) [1] The poetry we'll be reading about was written during the New Kingdom period, which took place from 1539-1075 B.C. It flourished under the patronage of the Ptolemaic dynasty and functioned as a major center of scholarship from its construction in the 3rd century BC until the Roman conquest of Egypt in 30 BC. It fell to the Persians in 343 BC after the last native Pharaoh, King Nectanebo II, was defeated in battle. [1] The New Kingdom is the period covering the Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth dynasties of Egypt, from the 16th century BC to the 11th century BC. A NEW KINGDOM FRAGMENTARY INLAID FAIENCE SHABTI FOR TA-WESERET dynasty xviii, reign of amenhotep iii, 1391-1353 b.c. [1] Stronger Nile floods and stabilization of government, however, brought back renewed prosperity for the country in the Middle Kingdom c. 2040 BC, reaching a peak during the reign of Pharaoh Amenemhat III. A second period of disunity heralded the arrival of the first foreign ruling dynasty in Egypt, that of the Semitic Hyksos. [1] The fall of the Old Kingdom ushered in a period of instability and internal strife until the elite of Thebes reunited Egypt around 2040 BC, reviving the power of the Pharaoh and successfully establishing the Middle Kingdom with its zenith during the eleventh and twelfth dynasty. [1] In 656 BC Psamtik I occupied Thebes and became Pharaoh, the King of Upper and Lower Egypt, four successive Saite kings continued guiding Egypt into another period of peace and prosperity from 610 to 525 BC. Unfortunately for this dynasty, a new power was growing in the Near East - Persia, Pharaoh Psamtik III had succeeded his father Ahmose II for only 6 months before he had to face the Persian Empire at Pelusium. [1] The Twenty-seventh Dynasty of Egypt, also known as the First Egyptian Satrapy was effectively a province (satrapy) of the Achaemenid Persian Empire between 525 BC to 404 BC. It was founded by Cambyses II, the King of Persia, after his conquest of Egypt and subsequent crowning as Pharaoh of Egypt, and was disestablished upon the rebellion and crowning of Amyrtaeus as Pharaoh. [1] The Thirty-first Dynasty of Egypt, also known as the Second Egyptian Satrapy, was effectively a short-lived province (satrapy) of the Achaemenid Persian Empire between 343 BC to 332 BC. It was founded by Artaxerxes III, the King of Persia, after his reconquest of Egypt and subsequent crowning as Pharaoh of Egypt, and was terminated upon the conquest of Egypt by Alexander the Great. [1]

The last pharaoh of the 26th Dynasty, Psamtik III, was defeated by Cambyses II at the battle of Pelusium in the eastern Nile delta in May of 525 BC. Cambyses was crowned Pharaoh of Egypt in the summer of that year at the latest, beginning the first period of Persian rule over Egypt (known as the 27th Dynasty). [1] The recorded history of Nile Valley civilization begins more than 5,000 years ago, with the Palette of Narmer, a stone tablet that dates from 3100 BC. The tablet states that Narmer, also known as Menes, is the first pharaoh to unite the kingdoms of Upper (Southern) and Lower (Northern) Egypt. [1] After king Kashta ("the Kushite") invaded Egypt in the 8th century BC, the Kushite kings ruled as Pharaohs of the Twenty-fifth dynasty of Egypt for a century, until they were expelled by Psamtik I in 656 BC. In early Greek geography, the Meroitic kingdom, with its imperial capital at Meroe, was known as Ethiopia. [1] A unified kingdom was founded c. 3150 BC by King Menes, leading to a series of dynasties that ruled Egypt for the next three millennia. [1] The Classic Age of Ancient India roughly corresponded, in the chronology of world history, to that of Ancient Greece 700 BC to 350 BC. Under a line of kings of the Nanda dynasty (reigned c. 424-322 BC), the kingdom dramatically expanded, to cover a large part of northern India. [1] The official history of Ancient Egypt civilization begins in 3100 BC (Early Dynastic Period c. 3050-2686 BC) when King Meni united the two kingdoms of Upper and Lower Egypt. [1]

In the period between 3200 and 3100 BC Narmer (Greek: Menes) forcibly united the two Egypts into a single kingdom himself becoming the first 'Pharaoh. [1] Chapter one, "Prelude to New Kingdom Warfare" (1-31), presents the historical outlook of Egypt at the end of the Second Intermediate Period (1630-1520 BC) and the commencement of Dynasty XVIII. During the former most of northern Egypt was controlled by a dynasty of Asiatic foreigners, the Hyksos, who had their capital in the delta city of Avaris, modern Tell ed-Dab'a. [1] BC Egypt, New Kingdom, Dynasty BC travertine, Diameter - cm inches) Diameter of mouth - cm inches) Overall - cm inches). [1] The New Kingdom c. 1550-1070 BC began with the Eighteenth Dynasty, marking the rise of Egypt as an international power that expanded during its greatest extension to an empire as far south as Tombos in Nubia, and included parts of the Levant in the east. [1] Dynasties 12, 13, as well as part of the 11 th are often called the "Middle Kingdom" by scholars and lasted from ca. 2030-1640 B.C. At the start of this dynasty, a ruler named Mentuhotep II (who reigned until about 2000 B.C.) reunited Egypt into a single country. [1] This pharaoh was the 5th pharaoh of the 18th dynasty and ruled from 1478 B.C. until her death in 1458 B.C. during the New Kingdom time period. [4]

Large Egyptian Painted Terracotta Shabti, 19th Dynasty, Ramesside Period, c. 1292-1085 B.C. As a result of subcutaneous packing, the mummy of King Seti I (1294-1279 BC) has "the most life-like and attractive face of the many Egyptian mummies, royal and commoner, that have survived down to present time," according to the authors. [1] Gradually native Egyptian rulers in Thebes (the 17th dynasty) were able to force back and then in 1555 BC defeat and end Hyksos rule, restoring Egypt to full unity and paving the way for the 18th dynasty's rise to power. [1] The first Egyptian in history was King Menes aka Narmer who lived shortly before 3,000 BC. At that time Egypt was divided into northern (lower) Egypt and southern (upper Egypt). [1] Later, the Assyrians attacked and managed to conquer much of Egypt around 650 BC. Until recently, it was thought that the trade route for the Egyptians to the Dead Sea was only available in Ptolemaic and later times, but archaeological discoveries and chemical analyses have revealed molecular evidence for trade during the earlier Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age periods (3900–2200 BC; ). [1] Later, the Assyrians attacked and managed to conquer much of Egypt around 650 BC. During certain periods of Egyptian history a mask made of cartonnage (linen, papyrus, and plaster prepared like papier-maché) or gold (like that of Tutankhamun) was placed over the head and shoulders of the mummy. [1] The earliest known copy dates to about 350 BC, other copies come from the Ptolemaic and Roman periods of Egyptian history, as late as the second century AD. The books were originally named The Letter for Breathing Which Isis Made for Her Brother Osiris, The First Letter for Breathing and they appear in many varying copies, and scholars have often confused them with each other. [1] "Following the end of the Twelfth Dynasty is 1786 BC, the next astronomically determinable 'anchor-point' in Egyptian history is the ninth year of the reign of King Amenophis I, the second ruler of the Eighteenth Dynasty. [1] The chronology for the period before the Canon of Kings, 1400 down to 700, is secured by the "Assyrian Kinglist" and a reported eclipse of the sun that can be dated to 15 June 763 BC. Later, the Assyrians attacked and managed to conquer much of Egypt around 650 BC. In 305 BC, Ptolemy took the title of King, as Ptolemy I Soter, he founded the Ptolemaic dynasty that was to rule Egypt for nearly 300 years. [1] The Old Kingdom was the first major civilization of Egypt, existing from roughly 2680-2180 BC. The first pharaoh of this time period, Djoser, built tombs in step pyramids, made from stacking progressively smaller layers. [1] This heralded the rise of the Old Kingdom under the third dynasty around 2640 BC, a period of relative stability and prosperity which lasted until the end of the sixth dynasty around 2160 BC. During this time, the city of Memphis in northern Egypt served as the royal residence. [1]

Later, the Assyrians attacked and managed to conquer much of Egypt around 650 BC. #scb9600: $225 SOLD New Kingdom, c. 1504-1450 BC. Nice steatite scarab with cartouche of Thutmose III. Beautifully carved, the legs nicely detailed, on base the cartouche of Thutmose III, along with a bee. [1] New Kingdom Egypt, c. 1570-1070 BC. Incredible steatite scaraboid in the form of a swan! The top highly detailed depicting a sleeping bird, the base engraved with Taweret, the hippo goddess of fertility and childbirth, holding an ankh (symbolizing "life"). [1] This book is an introduction to the war machine of New Kingdom Egypt from c. 1575 bc1100 bc. [1] The cult of the Sphinx reached its height in New Kingdom Egypt (1550-1070 BC), when the statue was already 1,200 years old. [1] In the aftermath of Alexander the Greats death, one of his generals, Ptolemy Soter and this Greek Ptolemaic Kingdom ruled Egypt until 30 BC, when, under Cleopatra, it fell to the Roman Empire and became a Roman province. [1] However in 30 BC Egypt became a province of the Roman Empire and ceased to be an independent kingdom. [1] Nectanebo I had gained control of all of Egypt by November of 380 BC, but spent much of his reign defending his kingdom from Persian reconquest with the occasional help of Sparta or Athens. [1] Thutmose I (1504-1492 BC) successfully extricated the foreign presence from Egypt, expanded its borders, and initiated the New Kingdom, considered the high point of pharaonic history. [1] Once adorned a ring! #578846: $150 SOLD Egypt, New Kingdom, c.1570 - 1075 BC. Steatite scarab with name of Maat-Hethes-Ra, which is a private name. [1] The New Kingdom is the period covering the Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth dynasties of Egypt, from the 16th century BC to the 11th century BC. In the Old Elamite period (Middle Bronze Age), Elam consisted of kingdoms on the Iranian Plateau, centered in Anshan, and from the mid-2nd millennium BC, it was centered in Susa in the Khuzestan lowlands. [1]

POSSIBLY USEFUL POSSIBLY USEFUL POSSIBLY USEFUL POSSIBLY USEFUL During the New Kingdom period some of the most familiar names in pharaohs ruled over Egypt, including Ramses, Tuthmose, and the heretic king Akhenaten The New Kingdom of Egypt, also referred to as the Egyptian Empire, is the period in ancient Egyptian history between 1550-1070 BCE, covering the Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Dynasties of Egypt. [1] The Sun temple of Userkaf was an Ancient Egyptian temple dedicated to the sun god Ra built by pharaoh Userkaf, the founder of the Fifth Dynasty of Egypt, at the beginning of the 25th century BCE. The first two ruling dynasties of a unified Egypt set the stage for the Old Kingdom period, c. 2700-2200 BC., which constructed many pyramids, most notably the Third Dynasty pyramid of Djoser and the Fourth Dynasty Giza pyramids. [1]

Entrance to royal tomb of Ramses X, Egyptian civilization, New Kingdom, Dynasty XX, 1112-1100 a.C., Valley of the Kings, West Bank of Thebes, Egypt. [1] The priests of Amun held power at Thebes in Upper Egypt and the Nubians in the south, with no central Egyptian power to hold them in check, took back the lands they had lost under Thuthmose III and the other great pharaohs of the New Kingdom. [9] POSSIBLY USEFUL The last "great" pharaoh from the New Kingdom is widely considered to be Ramesses III, a Twentieth Dynasty pharaoh who reigned several decades after Ramesses II. Possibly as a result of the foreign rule of the Hyksos during the Second Intermediate Period, the New Kingdom saw Egypt attempt to create a buffer between the Levant and Egypt proper, and during this time Egypt attained its greatest territorial extent. [1] The last "great" pharaoh from the New Kingdom is widely regarded to be Ramesses III. In the eighth year of his reign, the Sea Peoples invaded Egypt by land and sea, but were defeated by Ramesses III. The New Kingdom of Egypt spanned the Eighteenth to Twentieth Dynasties (c. 1550-1077 BCE), and was Egypt's most prosperous time. [1]

I examined food offerings and their corresponding imagery in Theban tombs from New Kingdom, Egypt (1550- 1070 BCE) in order to analyze how food in funerary rituals changed over time. [1] The Hyksos were driven out by Ahmose I (c. 1570-1544 BCE), founder of the 18th Dynasty and the New Kingdom period, who instantly set about securing and then expanding the borders of Egypt to provide a buffer zone against any further invasions. [1] The last "great" pharaoh from the New Kingdom is widely considered to be Ramesses III, a Twentieth Dynasty pharaoh who reigned several decades after Ramesses II. New Kingdom Egypt would reach the height of its power under Seti I and Ramesses II, who fought against the Libyans and Hittites. [1] Usimare Ramesses III was the second Pharaoh of the Twentieth Dynasty and is considered to be the last great New Kingdom king to wield any substantial authority over Egypt. [1] The last "great" pharaoh from the New Kingdom is widely considered to be Ramesses III, a 20th Dynasty pharaoh who reigned several decades after Ramesses II. The New Kingdom pharaohs commanded unimaginable wealth, much of which they lavished on their gods, especially Amun-Re of Thebes, whose cult temple at Karnak was augmented by succeeding generations of rulers and filled with votive statues commissioned by kings and courtiers alike. [1] The New Kingdom Egyptians may have given the name Hor-em-akhet to the Sphinx for this reason POSSIBLY USEFUL The New Kingdom pharaohs commanded unimaginable wealth, much of which they lavished on their gods, especially Amun-Re of Thebes, whose cult temple at Karnak was augmented by succeeding generations of rulers and filled with votive statues commissioned by kings and courtiers alike. [1] Several New Kingdom pharaohs ( Thutmes IV, Amenhetep III and Rameses II ) strengthened their international relations by marrying the daughters of foreign monarchs, and building Egyptian temples in foreign outposts. [10]

An Egyptian faience scarab for Amenhotep III, new kingdom, dynasty XVIII, reign of Amenhotep III, B. Thereafter, more internal troubles ultimately helped to seal the fate of the New Kingdom and the long period of Egyptian prosperity it embodied was forever over. [1] The Egyptian Empire rose during the period of the New Kingdom (c. 1570- c. 1069 BCE), when the country reached its height. [9] The New Kingdom (c. 1570- c.1069 BCE) is the era in Egyptian history following the disunity of the Second Intermediate Period (c. 1782-1570 BCE) and preceding the dissolution of the central government at the start of the Third Intermediate Period (c. 1069-c. 525 BCE). [9] The fact that the word " pharaoh " is so commonly used to reference any Egyptian ruler from any era attests to the impact the New Kingdom has had on the modern-day understanding of Egyptian history. [9] The New Kingdom is the most completely documented period in Egyptian history. [9]

During the New Kingdom period some of the most familiar names in pharaohs ruled over Egypt, including Ramses, Tuthmose, and the heretic king Akhenaten. [1] With the defeat of the foreign kings and their expulsion from Egypt, Ahmose I re-established his borders, pushed the Kushites further to the south, unified the country under his rule from the city of Thebes, and thus initiated the period of the New Kingdom. [9] Thebes was the capital of Egypt during the period of the New Kingdom (c.1570-c.1069 BCE) and became an important center. [9] The First and Second Intermediate Periods led to the Middle and the New Kingdoms but the Third Intermediate Period concludes with the Persian invasion of Egypt following the Battle of Pelusium in 525 BCE. After the Persians arrived Egypt never again became an autonomous state for any great length of time. [9]

RANKED SELECTED SOURCES(23 source documents arranged by frequency of occurrence in the above report)

1. (176) New Kingdom (Egypt, 1550 BC - 1070 BC)

2. (39) New Kingdom of Egypt - Ancient History Encyclopedia

3. (15) The Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt

4. (15) New Kingdom of Egypt - Wikipedia

5. (9) New Kingdom Egypt: Geography & Facts | Study.com

6. (9) The Periods of Egyptian History in Pictures

7. (9) Ancient Egypt (c. 3050 - c. 1070 BC) by undevicesimus on DeviantArt

8. (8) Ancient Egypt

9. (8) 6.20 Old, Middle, New Kingdom Pharaohs and Events Flashcards | Quizlet

10. (7) Cult of the Sphinx | New Kingdom Worship | Mark Lehner | Ancient Egypt Research Associates

11. (6) The New Kingdom: 1550-1070 BC

12. (6) A History of Ancient Egypt

13. (5) New Kingdom (1570 B.C.'1070 B.C.) - Theban Mapping Project

14. (5) The New and the Old Kingdom of Ancient Egypt Essay | Major Tests

15. (5) Bottle Egypt, New Kingdom, 1550-1070 B.C. LACMA | Ancient Egypt | Pinterest | Ancient egypt, Egyptian and Archaeology

16. (3) Egypt in the New Kingdom (ca. 1550-1070 B.C.) | Essay | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

17. (3) New Kingdom - Egypt by Quenton Runge on Prezi

18. (2) Egyptian funerary Stele from the New Kingdom Period, 1550-1070 B.C, from Thebes (Luxor). Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. no 10865 | Pinterest | Egyptian, A…

19. (1) Statue of a Woman. Egyptian, New Kingdom, ca. 1550 B.C.-1070 B.C. | Egyptian, Archaeology and Ancient egypt

20. (1) Beads, amulets and scarabs. Egyptian, New Kingdom, 18th-20th Dynasty, 1550-1070 B.C. | Ancient Jewelry & Artifacts | Pinterest | Egyptian, Ancient egyptian jew…

21. (1) Ancient Thebes -- World Heritage Site -- National Geographic

22. (1) Ancient Egyptian New Kingdom Alabaster Vase - 1500 BC - Artworks

23. (1) The 3 Kingdoms of Ancient Egypt: Old, Middle And New


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