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Ming Dynasty China Facts


  • Here are 10 interesting facts about the founding, rise, reign and fall of the Ming dynasty of China.
  • The Ming government was unable to stop Li’s rebellion as most of its military was involved in battle against the Manchus, ethnic Chinese of Manchuria.
  • A tribe descended from Jin dynasty rapidly extended its power as far south as Shanhai Pass, i.e. directly opposite the Great Wall, and would have taken over China quickly if not for the brilliant Ming commander, Yuan Chonghuan.
  • Zhu takes control of China as the first emperor of the Ming dynasty.
  • The Chinese had sent diplomatic missions over land since the Han dynasty (202 BCE - 220 CE) and engaged in private overseas trade, but these missions were unprecedented in grandeur and scale.
  • Instead of following the traditional way of naming a dynasty after the first ruler's home district, Zhu Yuanzhang's choice of "Ming," or "Brilliant," for his dynasty followed a Mongol precedent of choosing an uplifting title.
  • The Ming Empire was the last dynasty in China's history that reigned over by the ethnic Han Chinese.
  • Farmers in Southern China, which the Ming rulers looked suspiciously upon anyway, as indicated, were so heavily taxed that many farmers from Zhejiang, Fujian and Guangdong Provinces simply gave up farming and took to the sea in junks as Chinese pirates alongside the Japanese Wokou pirates, with whom they colluded, forming veritable pirate fleets and making the Chinese-Japanese pirate raids much more effective and thus much more threatening to the Chinese state.
  • On the foreign front, the Roman Emperor Hadrian (CE 117-38) was busy erecting his equivalent of China's Great Wall, i.e., Hadrian's Wall in northern England, in order to keep out the "barbarian" equivalent to the Chinese problem of "barbarians" that had prompted the construction of China's Great Wall.
  • The Forbidden City is the imperial palace that was once home to the emperors of China during the final two imperial dynasties, the Ming Dynasty and the Qing Dynasty.







Ming Dynasty China Definition


  • In 1912, after the overthrow of the Qing dynasty in the Xinhai Revolution, some advocated that a Han Chinese be installed as Emperor, either the descendant of Confucius, who was the Duke Yansheng, or the Ming dynasty Imperial family descendant, the Marquis of Extended Grace.
  • Ming Dynasty : The ruling dynasty of China for 276 years (1368-1644), following the collapse of the Mongol-led Yuan Dynasty; the last dynasty in China ruled by the ethnic Han Chinese.
  • Some historians believe the Mongols' discrimination against Han Chinese during the Yuan dynasty is the primary cause for the end of that dynasty.
  • LONDON -- The Ming Dynasty ruled China from 1368 to 1644, and it was under its aegis, during the first half of the 15th century, that technological and design advances brought milky white and cobalt-blue porcelain to perfection.
  • Beijing became the capital of China after the Mongol invasion of the 13th century, completing the easterly migration of the Chinese capital begun in the earlier Jin dynasty.
  • The Ming Dynasty, also Empire of the Great Ming, was the ruling dynasty of China for 276 years following the collapse of the Mongol-led Yuan Dynasty.
  • In ancient China (up until the Sui Dynasty), castration was one of the Five Punishments, a series for physical punishments meted out by the Chinese penal system.
  • The now-famous national monument fell into decay following the Ming Dynasty, when the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912 CE) took power and expanded the border of China northwards, making the wall obsolete.
  • Qing expansion and Zunghar resistance left strong legacies for the definition of the territory of the empire and the Chinese nation that succeeded it in the 20th century.










Ming Dynasty China Pottery


  • This caused a big boom in the Chinese porcelain industry as the demand for Chinese pottery greatly increased, especially because of Europeans who started collecting the beautiful Ming dynasty pottery.
  • During the Ming dynasty, ceramic technique evolved quickly and kilns were able to develop a more refined type of porcelain.
  • Major artists contributed to Ming ceramic artwork and before the European caught a taste for it, Ming porcelain was already famous among Chinese countrymen scholars, nobles and merchants who collected the wares themselves.
  • A Ming vase from the Yongle dynasty, when the porcelain reached its most refined form.
  • The Ming dynasty was an extraordinary period in Chinese history, not only for the political shifts which took place during this era but for the evolution of kiln technology.
  • Ming Dynasty : The ruling dynasty of China for 276 years (1368-1644), following the collapse of the Mongol-led Yuan Dynasty; the last dynasty in China ruled by the ethnic Han Chinese.
  • Beginning with the Han Dynasty (206 B.C.-220 A.D.), and into the T'ang (618-907 A.D.), Sung (960-1279 A.D.), Yuan (1279-1368 A.D.), and Ming (1368-1644 A.D.) dynasties, large quantities of pottery and porcelain were exported from China to Korea, Japan, the Ryukyu Islands, the Southeast Asian peninsula, the Philippines, Indonesia, India, the Middle East, the eastern coast of Africa, continental Europe, Great Britain, and the United States.
  • Right: Chinese Blue and White Glazed Porcelain Vase, Qing Dynasty, sold for $1,375 via Doyle New York (September 2015).
  • First appeared in East Han Dynasty, the white porcelain is the basic pottery for color-glazed porcelain, and has the largest market share.



















Ming and Qing Dynasty China


  • Trade- Dutch Chinese has strict rules on trade Had to trade on China's grounds Only Dutch accepted their trade rules and thrived on it They obtained porcelain, silk, and tea Tea became China's main export Ming and Qing Dynasty Ruled from 1661 to 1722, reduced taxes for peasants and expanded the empire into parts of Central Asia. supported the arts and entertained Jesuit preists at court Kangxi's grandson brought the Qing dynasty to its heights.
  • From the early Qing, the central government was characterized by a system of dual appointments by which each position in the central government had a Manchu and a Han Chinese assigned to it.
  • Like Kublai Khan at the beginning of the Yuan Dynasty, and Zhu Yuanzhang in the beginning of the Ming Dynasty, during his 61-year rule he set the policy direction for the empire and stabilized it.
  • Constructed for the founding emperors of the Qing Dynasty and their ancestors, the tombs follow the precepts of traditional Chinese geomancy and fengshui theory.
  • The Qing, a Laissez-Faire State?
  • The clan regulations in the Ming and Qing Dynasties not only specified the compulsory execution of ancestor worship ceremony but also made detailed restrictions and provisions regarding participants and procedures: the ancestor worship shall be hosted by clan leader or patriarch and only this-worldly descendants (mainly referring to the male adults in principal family) of the worshiped ancestor are eligible to participate in the ceremony.
  • The local government in the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) inscribed on a stone tablet outside of the gate of the mausoleum, an order to protect the tomb.
  • Chinese scholars stressed the incorporation of multiple nationalities under Qing rule, viewing the conquests as benevolent reunification of Chinese territory.
  • Began in 1661, last for 247 years, it was finally completed in 1908 and reflects a complete evolution of mausoleum system as well as the history of Qing Dynasty.








































Ming Dynasty China Culture


  • In 1912, after the overthrow of the Qing dynasty in the Xinhai Revolution, some advocated that a Han Chinese be installed as Emperor, either the descendant of Confucius, who was the Duke Yansheng, or the Ming dynasty Imperial family descendant, the Marquis of Extended Grace.
  • The Ming, described by Edwin O. Reischauer, John K. Fairbank and Albert M. Craig as "one of the greatest eras of orderly government and social stability in human history", was the last imperial dynasty in China ruled by ethnic Han Chinese.
  • On 7 August 1461, the Chinese general Cao Qin and his Ming troops of Mongol descent staged a coup against the Tianshun Emperor out of fear of being next on his purge-list of those who aided him in the Wresting the Gate Incident.
  • In 1368, an eminent peasant leader named Zhu Yuanzhang (Emperor Taizu) - responsible for securing a number of important victories in battles during the rebellions - was crowned emperor and went on to establish the Ming Dynasty (1368 - 1644).
  • The Ming Dynasty is known as the Empire of the Great Ming, was the ruling dynasty in China throughout the years 1368-1644, it was considered one of the greatest eras of orderly government and social stability in human history.
  • Beijing became the capital of China after the Mongol invasion of the 13th century, completing the easterly migration of the Chinese capital begun in the earlier Jin dynasty.
  • The span in which the Ming dynasty ruled China (1368–1644) was a period of incredible political and cultural growth for the nation.



















Ming Dynasty Chinese Ceramics


  • LONDON -- The Ming Dynasty ruled China from 1368 to 1644, and it was under its aegis, during the first half of the 15th century, that technological and design advances brought milky white and cobalt-blue porcelain to perfection.
  • Chinese ceramics range from construction materials such as bricks and tiles, to hand-built pottery vessels fired in bonfires or kilns, to the sophisticated Chinese porcelain wares made for the imperial court and for export.
  • Underwater archaeology in Southeast Asia began in 1975 when the Fine Arts Department of Thailand collaborated with the Viking Ship Museum of Denmark to survey the Gulf of Thailand. 14 The story of underwater archaeology in Southeast Asia since then consists of a few major scientific triumphs and many stunning defeats when sites containing data that could have revolutionized the understanding of Chinese ceramic production and trade have been destroyed by looters.
  • Wares of this type are thought to be products of unofficial kilns, which assumed growing importance in the last part of the Ming dynasty as a result of weak imperial patronage. (Text by Josephine Hadley Knapp, published in the NGA Systematic Catalogue: Decorative Arts, Part II: Far Eastern Ceramics and Paintings; Persian and Indian Rugs and Carpets ) Notes 1.
  • Ming dynasty commentator Gao Lian claims that the ge kiln took its clay from the same site as Guan ware, which is what accounts for the difficulty in distinguishing one from the other (though Gao thinks "Ge is distinctly inferior" to Guan).
  • Currently, extraordinary auction prices achieved for mark and period (a term for when the mark on a piece corresponds to its actual date of creation) later Chinese ceramics, white jades, older Buddhist bronzes and cloisonnes, certain types of hardwood furniture, top-quality snuff bottles, and large coral carvings rule those fields out for most beginning collectors.








































Ming Dynasty Chinese Furniture


  • The Ming Dynasty is considered, in hindsight, the golden era in the development of ancient Chinese furniture.
  • Often completely unornamented (although the complete range of decorative degree does exist), they obtain their stunning effect principally through their perfection of line, and their magnificent hardwood material (left on view through a clear finish, not covered in lacquer as with so much Chinese furniture, then and especially later).
  • A Ming dynasty huanghuali wood luohan bed with round legs and double-circle ornamental design.
  • This put the ingeniuity of the Chinese furniture craftsman to the test, but he responded creatively to the challenge, reserving the best quality wood – appearance-wise – for the most visible surfaces, while making use of lesser-attractive pieces of wood for the rest.
  • In Ming dynasty China, traditional wood architecture and Buddhist thrones inspired Chinese furniture makers and, as trade expanded, so did the amount of hardwood furniture in the form of sophisticated movable pieces and built-in interiors.
  • Craftsmen of the Ming Dynasty used the succinct language of art to express their inner feelings, and combined ingeniously the beauty of simplicity and quietness.
  • During the Ming dynasty, a ban on maritime trade was lifted, making huanghuali and other hardwoods available.
  • These chairs were often crafted out of huanghuali, which is part of the rosewood family, and was a favorite hardwood in traditional Chinese furniture.
  • Only 1 Left Solid hardwood coffee table that resembles Ming dynasty traditional table design.

























Ming Dynasty Great Wall Of China


  • The Great Wall of the Ming Dynasty starts from Jiayuguan in western China’s Gansu Province, following the mountains bordering Inner Mongolia and the North China Plain, to the Bohai Gulf at Shanhai Pass, and then looping round the Bohai Gulf to terminate at the Hushan Great Wall section on the North Korean border.
  • The Great Wall of China is a barrier fortification in northern China running west-to-east 13,171 miles (21,196 km) from the Jiayuguan Pass (in the west) to the Hushan Mountains in Liaoning Province in the east, ending at the Bohai Gulf.
  • In the west, Shaanxi province became the target of nomads riding west from the Yellow River loop. The westernmost fortress of Ming China, the Jiayu Pass, saw substantial enhancement with walls starting in 1539, and from there border walls were built discontinuously down the Gansu Corridor to Wuwei, where the low earthen wall split into two.
  • His wall was not regarded by the Chinese people under the Qin Dynasty as a symbol of national pride or unity but as a place where people were sent to labor for the emperor until they died.
  • Let us look at some other stories, from other times in history, beginning all the way back with Qin Shi Huangdi, the first emperor of the Qin dynasty who unified China in 221 BCE. As part of his grand enterprise of uniting the formerly divided feudal states under his thumb, he actually deconstructed most of the walls that he encountered in his new empire, only enforcing small segments at the northern border.
  • During the great building efforts of Qin, Han and Ming dynasties, there was even a specific punishment for convicted criminals to work on the Wall.
  • The most popular (and arguably the most beautiful) section was erected during the Ming Dynasty, and runs for 5,500.3 miles between Hushan to the Jiayuguan Pass.
  • Work on the wall started as soon as the Ming took control of China but initially, walls were not the Ming's preferred response to raids out of the north.
  • The Great Wall of China is more than twice as long as originally believed, according to the first definitive archaeological survey of the iconic ancient defensive structure.
  • During this period, from A.D. 386-581, four dynasties built and added to the Great Wall.





























































































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