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Tokugawa Shogunate Government


  • The late Tokugawa shogunate ( Japanese : 幕末 Bakumatsu ) was the period between 1853 and 1867, during which Japan ended its isolationist foreign policy called sakoku and modernized from a feudal shogunate to the Meiji government.
  • During its final 30 years in power the Tokugawa shogunate had to contend with peasant uprisings and samurai unrest as well as with financial problems.
  • For more than 100 years before the Tokugawa Shogunate took power in Japan in 1603, the country wallowed in lawlessness and chaos during the Sengoku ("Warring States") period of 1467 to 1573.
  • The powerful southwestern tozama domains of Chōshū and Satsuma exerted the greatest pressure on the Tokugawa government and brought about the overthrow of the last shogun, Hitosubashi Keiki (or Yoshinobu), in 1867.
  • The Tokugawa shogunate, also known as the Tokugawa bakufu ( 徳川幕府 ?
  • The Emperor moved from Kyoto to Edo the following year, and his government swept away most of the systems established by the shogunate.
  • The process by which the United States and the Western powers forced Japan into modern commercial intercourse, along with other internal factors, weakened the position of the Tokugawa Shogunate to the point that the shogun fell from power.
  • Tokugawa established a government at Edo (now known as Tokyo ), and set up a strict hierarchical government which remained in power for 250 years, until the Meiji Restoration in 1868.
  • The Meiji Restoration was a chain of events, triggered by an internal crisis and strong anti-Western sentiments, that ended the Edo period and thus the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and restored practical imperial rule to Japan in 1868 under Emperor Meiji.












































































The Tokugawa Shogunate Japan from the Outside World


  • Sakoku ( 鎖国, "closed country") was the isolationist foreign policy of the Japanese Tokugawa shogunate under which relations and trade between Japan and other countries were severely limited, nearly all foreigners were barred from entering Japan and the common Japanese people were kept from leaving the country for a period of over 220 years.
  • Japanese Christians, who had been converted by Portuguese traders and missionaries in previous years, were first banned from practicing their religion in 1614 by Tokugawa Hidetada.
  • The process by which the United States and the Western powers forced Japan into modern commercial intercourse, along with other internal factors, weakened the position of the Tokugawa Shogunate to the point that the shogun fell from power.
  • KEY TOPICS KEY TOPICS KEY TOPICS KEY TOPICS KEY TOPICS Feudal Period Japan fell apart, the emperor became a figure- head, and rival Daimyo fought one another constantly " alt"How was Japan’s imperialist experience unique?
  • Was Japan isolated in the eighteenth century?
  • The term "four portals" ( yottsu no kuchi ) is now virtually standard terminology in Japanese history textbooks, but it was a foreign concept when I introduced it some 30 years ago in an effort to overturn the prevailing image of early modern Japan as a country shut off from the rest of the world.
  • Deshima Island, a " bustling port which over the centuries has played host to Chinese, Dutch, English and American trading vessels," "for 250 years between 1632 and 1854 served as Japan's only official link to the outside world" (from Teaching & Learning about Japan ).




Tokugawa Shogunate Isolation Japan


  • Sakoku ( 鎖国, "closed country") was the isolationist foreign policy of the Japanese Tokugawa shogunate under which relations and trade between Japan and other countries were severely limited, nearly all foreigners were barred from entering Japan and the common Japanese people were kept from leaving the country for a period of over 220 years.
  • Japan's isolation policy was fully implemented by Tokugawa Iemitsu, the grandson of Ievasu and shogun from 1623 to 1641.
  • Nearly everything foreign was banned(including books) What are some other reasons Tokugawa Ieyasu did this?
  • The Tokugawa shogunate isolated Japan from foreign influence because of the fear of being conquered.
  • By the mid-17th century, Neo-Confucianism was Japan's dominant legal philosophy and contributed directly to the development of the kokugaku, a school of Japanese philology and philosophy that originated during the Tokugawa period.
  • Japan's isolation initiated the "Pax Tokugawa" or Tokugawa peace.
  • The isolationist policy of the Tofugawa shogunate known as sakoku tightly controlled Japanese trade and foreign influences for over 200 years, ending with the Perry Expedition that forced Japan to open its market to European imperial powers.
  • In the history of Japan, the 265-year period between 1603 (when Tokugawa Ieyasu became the generalissimo or great "shogun" of the Tokugawa shogunate) and 1867 (when Tokugawa Yoshinobu formally returned political authority to the emperor) is called the Edo Period.
  • In 1627, a revolt by Christian samurais and peasants called the Shimabara Rebellion angered the Shogunate and issued the Seclusion Decree that outlawed Christianity and closed Japan to the world starting a period of isolation.














































































































































































































































Tokugawa Ieyasu Shogun 2


  • When Nobunaga was forced to commit suicide by General Akechi Mitsuhide in 1582, Tokugawa Ieyasu aided Hideyoshi in defeating him in 1582.
  • Tokugawa Ieyasu (1542-1616) was the founder and first shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate, or military government, which maintained effective rule over Japan from 1600 until 1867.
  • Shogun 2 was very polished however. my only complaint being the lack of variety of units between the clans.
  • Tokugawa Ieyasu (previously spelled Iyeyasu; 徳川 家康) (January 31, 1543 - June 1, 1616) was a Japanese warrior and the founder and first shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan which ruled from the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 until the Meiji Restoration in 1868.
  • Tokugawa Ieyasu was born into a period of history known as Feudal Japan, when Japan was fractured under the rule of numerous competing warlords known as daimyo.
  • The Obama Faction Pack adds a new playable faction to Total War: SHOGUN 2 - Fall of the Samurai for use in single or multiplayer Campaign modes and Custom and Multiplayer Battles With long experience of government and administration, the authoritarian people of Obama are unsurpassed in controlling people and trade.
  • Ronald Toby, in State and Diplomacy in Early Modern Japan: Asia in the Development of the Tokugawa Bakufu (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1984), 23 n. 2, argues that these are examples of Ieyasu "acting alone in foreign affairs," but this exaggerates the evidence.
  • It's genuinely disquieting the first time you fight a large-scale battle in Shogun 2, and glimpse the aftermath.









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